- National Center for Youth Law - https://youthlaw.org -

Funding News – July-Sept 2015

Arizona Community Foundation [1]

NCYL received a grant from the Ellis Center for Educational Excellence held by the Arizona Community Foundation in support of FosterEd: Arizona. FosterEd is working to improve the educational outcomes of children and youth in foster care. The grant funding supports FosterEd’s partnership with WestEd to conduct a study of the education outcomes of Arizona’s K-12 students in foster care. The study will produce a user-friendly report summarizing key findings for policymakers and practitioners, and a companion technical report detailing the methodology.

 

The California Endowment [2]

NCYL received a grant from The California Endowment to strengthen the capacity of low-income and marginalized communities to engage in health advocacy in California.  The grant funding supports NCYL’s work to ensure that youth at risk of involvement or involved in the juvenile justice system have the opportunity to become healthy, productive adults. This includes (1) Eliminating harsh school discipline of students and improving campus climate and supports for all students; (2) Ensuring appropriate treatment for youth within the juvenile justice system; and (3) Building power in poor, under-served communities by providing support and technical assistance to community-based organizations.

 

The California Wellness Foundation [3]

NCYL received a two-year grant from The California Wellness Foundation to inform policymakers about public policies affecting incarcerated youth as a violence prevention and re-entry strategy. The grant funding will support NCYL’s advocacy for community-based services that address social-emotional health needs as an alternative to incarceration, reduce the number of youth tried as adults, and improve statewide data collection and analysis around youth transferred to adult courts.

 

Hedge Funds Care | Help for Children [4]

NCYL received a grant from Hedge Funds Care | Help for Children [4] to improve the health and safety of the more than ten thousand foster children in California who are administered psychotropic medications. NCYL is working with California state agencies, former foster children, and many others who care about abused or neglected children to reduce the number of foster children given multiple psychotropic drugs, and to stop giving them inappropriate dosages. Our work takes advantage of a 2011 federal law requiring all states to adopt standards for appropriate use and monitoring of psychotropic medications for foster children. In California, home to the country’s largest foster care population, almost one in every five children between the ages of six and eighteen years old in the foster care system is on one or more psychotropic medication.

 

Mylan Settlement Fund

NCYL received a grant to improve the health and safety of foster children in California who are administered psychotropic medications from the Mylan Settlement Fund, created as a result of an antitrust class action. The grant funding supports NCYL’s work with youth and partners to provide awareness, trainings, and logistical support to professionals across the state to ensure the appropriate use and monitoring of psychotropic medications for children in foster care, and to support NCYL’s ongoing work the state Quality Improvement Project (California’s new protocol to ensure the appropriate use and monitoring of psychotropic medications for foster children).

 

Nina Mason Pulliam Trust [5]

NCYL received a grant from the Nina Mason Pulliam Charitable Trust in support of FosterEd: Arizona. This project will result in a new foster youth education program that ensures the approximately 9,000 foster youth living in Maricopa County have meaningful education plans, engaged educational champions and active education teams supporting their school success. In collaboration with state agencies, legislators and executive officials, FosterEd develops policies and infrastructure to ensure foster children receive the educational opportunities they need. In partnership with local education, child welfare, and judicial agencies, FosterEd implements new practices to ensure foster children succeed in school

 

Sandler Foundation [6] Offers Challenge Grant

NCYL is honored to be the recipient of a grant from the Sandler Foundation [6] of the Jewish Community Endowment Fund, which includes a generous challenge grant. The Sandler grant is dependent on NCYL raising new or increased gifts, meaning from people or organizations that have not previously given to NCYL, or from previous donors in amounts greater than they have given before.

Please help us take advantage of this tremendous opportunity by making a donation today! [7]

The Sandler Foundation has made contributions to NCYL since 1997, and inspired giving from others. All of the Foundation’s gifts to NCYL have been for much appreciated unrestricted support. This money allows NCYL to move quickly when necessary to help our clients without the need to first raise the money.

 

Stuart Foundation [8]

NCYL received a grant from the Stuart Foundation in support of FosterEd: California. FosterEd partners with state and local education, child welfare and judicial agencies, as well as community organizations, to improve the educational outcomes of students in the State’s care. FosterEd helps local agencies design and implement programs and practices that proactively identify educational strengths and needs; uses data to drive education case planning; and ensures every student in foster care is supported by an educational champion and an education team. This informs FosterEd’s policy efforts, focused on improving the capacity of systems to collaboratively ensure students in foster care receive the supports and services they need to succeed in school and thrive in life.

 

Union Bank Foundation [9]

NCYL received a grant from Union Bank Foundation in support of its Summer Internship Program, NCYL’s highly-regarded leadership development program designed to train and mentor the next generation of child advocates. Interns work closely with NCYL staff attorneys who are among the most respected children’s lawyers in the country. Through the experience, the interns acquire practical skills they will need as lawyers to effectively serve low-income children, in a setting that advances their educational and career goals.